Domain Today





Domain Today

Expired Domain - Domain Purchase - Register Domain - Change Domain

Choosing Domain - Public Domain - Name Generator - Website Domain






Listen to Coronavirus Patient Zero

Choosing A Bible

RRP $7.99

Click on the Google Preview image above to read some pages of this book!

Of the many Bible translations available today, are some better than others? If so, what criteria can we use to determine what makes a good translation? Leland Ryken introduces readers to the central issues in this debate and presents several reasons why essentially literal—word-for-word—translations are superior to dynamic equivalent—thought-for-thought—translations.

You don’t have to be a Bible scholar to recognize the need for a quality Bible translation. We all want to know that the Bible we read, study, and memorize is faithful to the original. Dr. Ryken tackles this issue and breaks it down in this concise, logical, and straightforward book, giving readers a valuable tool for selecting a Bible translation.

“Professor Ryken draws on decades of experience… to show that many modern English translations fail to meet accepted standards of excellence in accuracy, faithfulness to the words of the author, clarity, vividness, correctness….”
Dr. Wayne Grudem, Professor of Bible and Theology, Phoenix Seminary

“The persistent, detonating logic of Lee Ryken’s pen will educate and convince any fair-minded person that the primary Bible for study and preaching must be an essentially literal translation.”
Dr. R. Kent Hughes, Pastor, College Church, Wheaton, IL

“A masterful and convincing argument for literal, that is to say, transparent translation of the Holy Scriptures.”
Dr. J. I. Packer, Professor of Theology, Regent College, Vancouver, B.C.

“An ideal guide to choosing a translation of the Word that transcends trendy words. In the process, he implicitly indicts those who settle for less.”
Marvin Olasky, Editor-in-Chief, World Magazine


Mercantilism In A Japanese Domain

RRP $293.99

Click on the Google Preview image above to read some pages of this book!

This book explores the historical roots of economic nationalism within Japan. By examining how mercantilist thought developed in the eighteenth-century domain of Tosa, the author shows how economic ideas were generated within the domains. During the Edo period (1600-1867), Japan was divided into over 230 realms, many of which developed into competitive states that struggled to reduce the dominance of the shogun's economy. The seventeenth-century Japanese economy was based on samurai notions of service and a rhetoric of political economy which centred on the lord and the samurai class. This 'economy of service', however, led to crises of deforestation and land degradation, government fiscal insolvency and increasingly corrupt tax levies, and finally a loss of faith in government. Commoners led the response with a mercantilist strategy of protection and development of the commercial economy. They resisted the economy of service by creating a new economic rhetoric which decentred the lord, imagined the domain as an economic country, and gave merchants a public worth and identity unknown in Confucian economic thought.



Search

Domain Today Articles

Expired Domain Domain Purchase Register Domain Change Domain
Choosing Domain Public Domain Name Generator Website Domain
Name Registration Cheap Domain Name Registrar Renewing Domain

Domain Today Books

Expired Domain Domain Purchase Register Domain Change Domain
Choosing Domain Public Domain Name Generator Website Domain
Name Registration Cheap Domain Name Registrar Renewing Domain

Domain Today